Liberal Arts

Liberal Arts

Course Listings

LIBERAL ARTS REQUIRED COURSEWORK

45 units required for the BFA degree, including 15 from Art History


 

WELLNESS — The Artist as a Vital Force

3 units required

WELLNESS: BALANCING THE WHOLE PERSON

(LA101)

3 units Units

Wellness is an active process of making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. There are many dimensions of wellness: academic, emotional, spiritual, physical, social, intellectual, environmental, financial, occupational, etc. Each dimension of wellness overlaps with others, and each is equally vital in the pursuit of optimum health. Wellness is also related to one’s ideology (ethics, personal values, belief systems, behavior) and character (being trustworthy, respectful, responsible, fair, caring, etc.), and these will be examined as they relate to how we choose to act. Students will learn how one can reach an optimal level of wellness by understanding how to maintain and optimize each of the dimensions of wellness. Guest experts will visit to discuss specialized aspects of the course content, and several classes will be devoted to putting the lessons into active practice. Required in residence for all majors (except those who completed the Speech requirement prior to Fall 2016).

COMMUNITY SERVICE, VOLUNTEERISM, INTERNSHIPS

(LA052)

1-3 units Credit/Non-Credit Units

Students may earn up to 3 units of credit by offering their services within the local community. Students learn first hand how to affect positive change in the world through their actions, while at the same time becoming vital contributors to society, growing personally, professionally, and academically. Students can sign-up for 1, 2, or 3 units of LA052 per semester. For each unit of credit, a minimum number of service hours must be performed and documented. The student meets with the instructor initially to coordinate the specifics of the class work. The instructor then monitors the work with both the student (on an Independent Study basis) and the organization involved. Upon completion of service work, the student will write a brief reflective paper summarizing her or his experiences to complete the course work. This course is open to all students. Graded Pass/No Pass only. Does not count toward a student’s GPA, but does count toward units earned. Prerequisites: Recommendation by instructor and good academic standing.

 ENGLISH SKILLS – The Artist as Communicator

6 units required (in addition to any preparatory classes) 

NON-REQUIRED PREPARATORY CLASSES

COLLEGE PREPARATORY WRITING 1 & 2

(LA010 & LA011)

2 units Credit/Non-Credit; no grade points Units

Both College Preparatory Writing 1 & 2 are basic pre-baccalaureate developmental writing courses designed to teach students the fundamentals of grammar and conventional writing mechanics, including punctuation, spelling, vocabulary, appropriate diction, varied sentence structure, organization, and clarity. Each course may have to be repeated (with a temporary grade of "Satisfactory Progress" given) before a passing grade is earned and matriculation to the next level allowed. Does not count toward a student’s GPA, but does count toward units earned. Course fees.

WRITING REQUIREMENT (4 units)

ENGLISH COMPOSITION

(LA108)

2 Units

Prerequisites: Satisfactorily passing the LCAD English Placement Diagnostic or consent of College Preparatory Writing 2 instructor.

This first leg of the required freshman writing requirement is taken the first semester of a student’s freshman year and focuses on exploratory writing and methods of rhetoric. This course helps students discover that writing is a natural, creative and meaningful activity that helps them learn about themselves and the world. Students reach a level of expository writing deemed appropriate for the university level, in preparation for the more sophisticated writing that is required later in their academic careers. Classes are conducted in a workshop setting where students explore issues of craft and various strategies for effective writing. Minimum passing grade for this course is a “C” in order to matriculate into the second leg of the freshman writing requirement: Critical Reasoning (LA110).

CRITICAL REASONING

(LA110)

2 Units

Prerequisites: Satisfactorily passing the LCAD English Placement Diagnostic or consent of College Preparatory Writing 2 instructor.

This second leg of the freshman writing requirement focuses on analytical skills and academic research. Students learn various methods of inquiry, analysis, and argumentation then practice their reasoning skills in writing assignments, class discussions, and oral presentations. Assigned readings focus on basic philosophical questions and issues facing thinkers in all academic disciplines. Students learn the importance of questioning and critiquing the words and ideas of others. Ultimately, students experience firsthand how critical reasoning processes enable them to become informed and educated citizens of the world, with the abilities to affect change via their own words and actions. Minimum passing grade for this course is a “C” and successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for all Liberal Arts & Art History courses. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in English Composition.

ANALYTICAL SKILLS — The Artist as Thinker and Synthesizer of Information

2 units required

SENIOR CAPSTONE 1 & 2

(LA421 / LA422)

1+2 Units

Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently

SENIOR CAPSTONE 1 (LA421) 1 unit (required, first semester, senior year)
SENIOR CAPSTONE 2 (LA422) 2 units (required, second semester, senior year)
LA421 and LA422 combine for a year-long summative course designed to foster intellectual, conceptual and artistic self-reflection by the graduating senior. Students articulate the direction, meaning and aesthetic context of their Senior Portfolio 1 and 2 studio projects via the writing of a senior paper, which also explores the student’s influences, personal aesthetics, artistic philosophy and goals. Prerequisites: Senior standing and for Senior Capstone 2, the completion of all but 3 units of the Liberal Arts coursework requirements
Special requirements: Senior Capstone 1 must be taken concurrently with Senior Portfolio 1 and Senior Capstone 2 must be taken concurrently with Senior Portfolio 2. Neither may be taken on an independent-study basis.

HUMANITIES – The Artist & World Cultures

3 units required

THE HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

(LA211)

3 Units

Prerequisites: English Composition; may be taken concurrently with Critical Reasoning, but not before. Western Civilization 1 must be taken before Western Civilization 2. Materials fee.

This required interdisciplinary course aims at informing students about Western intellectual and cultural heritage through synthesizing primary resources in literature, philosophy, psychology, religion and music. The goal is to generate an individual mode of life; that is, to consider one’s place in the world and how one might live a worthwhile life. The approach to the resources is personal and visceral, with the ultimate ideal objective of applying assimilated cultural experiences to the process of living and of making art. This course covers Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Modern period and interfaces with Western Art 1 and Western Art 2.

PROJECT GREEN: ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY & CULTURAL CONSCIOUSNESS

(LA223)

3 Units

This course explores humankind’s relationship with the planet, examining how both ancient and modern civilizations have related to the environment and developed differing philosophies on stewardship. Diverse cultural and ecological factors are studied to identify the variables that contribute to altering environmental conditions. Students then investigate modern environmental problems facing our planet with an emphasis on the history of our changing local ecology. The class surveys the history of the conservation movement, contemporary local and global conservation efforts and explores critical issues currently facing California’s ecosystems. Students gain an increased awareness of environmental issues and their own relationship with the environment in their daily lives.

Gender Studies in Popular Culture

(LA228)

3 Units

An interdisciplinary approach to American culture, this course explores the origins and perceptions of gender in culture and society. Drawing on visual studies, literary theory, sociology, politics, economy, et al., issues of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, bias, and stereotypes are explored as they relate primarily to media representation and language, as well as to such diverse topics as health, public policy, labor, and law. Content in advertising (semiotics, visual literacy, etc.) is a good starting place to extend the analyses into television, film, music, and game art. This course may focus on a different theme or culture each time it is taught. Satisfies either the American Cultural Experience requirement or the Non-Western Cultural Experience Requirement, depending on the focus.

Gender Studies: The Voyeuristic Gaze—Depiction of Women in Art from Edo Japan and Europe

(LA2238)

3 Units

The visual representation of women in Japan and Europe in the nineteenth century is simultaneously erotic, intriguing, and disturbing. Students explore the voyeuristic gaze manifested in artwork from East and West, from Geishas and courtesans in Edo Japan to ballerinas and prostitutes in Paris. Through an examination of the representations of women from Japan and Europe, students discern the interdisciplinary connections between the visual arts and gender studies. Artists studied include Utagawa Kunisada, Kitagawa Utamaro, Edgar Degas, and Mary Cassatt. This course may focus on different themes or cultures each time it is taught. Satisfies either the Non-Western Cultural Experience requirement or the Non-Western Art Requirement, or sometimes the American Culture Requirement, depending on the focus.

FRENCH

(LA272)

2 Units

An introductory language course in French. Satisfies the Speech Requirement for all majors.

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

(LA273)

3 Units

The focus of this class is on real-life language use, the integration of culture and language and the four skills of reading, listening, writing and speaking. Students actively engage in group work. Language skills are evaluated through oral and written tests; cultural knowledge is evaluated through oral presentations on a specific topics. Satisfies the Speech Requirement for all majors, or serves as a Liberal Arts elective.

SPANISH

(LA274)

2 Units

An introductory language course in Spanish. Satisfies the Speech Requirement for all majors.

SOCIAL SCIENCES – Human Experience, Environments & Interrelationships

6 units required  (3 units of Non-Western Cultural Experience + 3 units of American Culture)

Non-Western Cultures

(LA225)

3 Units

This anthropology course focuses on a specific non-western culture within the framework of individual civilizations (Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, etc.), developing a comparative analysis of these cultures.

Pre-Columbian and Mexican Cultures

(LA226)

3 Units

Beginning with the pre-Columbian cultures of the Olmec, the Maya, and the Mexica, and concluding with modern and contemporary expressions in Latin American and Chicano literature, art, philosophy, and cinema, this interdisciplinary
humanities course surveys the rich and complex cultural history of the Spanish-speaking world.

Islamic Perspectives

(LA227)

3 Units

A political science course that examines Islam from its rise in the seventh century to the present. Satisfies either the American Culture requirement or the Non-Western Culture requirement.

Anthropology: Religious Diversity and Belief Systems

(LA228)

3 Units

An anthropological survey of belief systems and religions, both past and present, from diverse societies around the world. Areas of emphasis include the supernatural, myth, religious healing, magic, ritual, witchcraft and sorcery.  Studying religious activity as a form of social and cultural expression, students develop an appreciation for religious and cultural diversity, human biological and intellectual equality, and cultural competency skills for working with diverse groups of people (both locally and internationally).

Multi-Cultural Healing

(LA229)

3 Units

This course facilitates understanding of the human being as an integrated physiological, psychological, and social organism.  This course provides a cross-cultural perspective of health and healing by looking at ethnic groups in the U.S. as well as a global perspective.  Personal awareness of health-related issues may be expected to broaden with this exposure to diverse cultural approaches.

Pre-Columbian Art

(LA246)

3 Units

This class surveys the art of the pre-Columbian cultures of the Olmec, the Maya, and the Mexica.

Art and Culture of Africa

(LA252)

3 Units

A focus on Africa, with emphasis on its societies, peoples, and material cultures. Students study the adaptation of humans to diverse environments and the resulting characteristics manifested in social structures, art, economy, political organizations and religions. A multidisciplinary approach among anthropology, sociology, art history, and art.

Cultural Wonders of Ancient Asia

(LA253)

3 Units

Exposes the student to the cultural, aesthetic, religious, and historical achievements of ancient Asian cultures, including those of China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, and others. Some of the many topics explored include early and sustained contact between the East the West, as well as cultural interactions between Asian cultures in the past that have shaped this part of the world as we see it today.

Art and Culture: World Cinema

(LA249)

3 Units

A survey—international in its scope—of the history, theory, techniques, and development of motion pictures. This course considers international film history in relation to its socio-historical, political, cultural, artistic, and technological contexts. The main focus of class time is on film as an interactive medium and art form.

World Religions

(LA240)

3 Units

Students read primary texts in religion. The course may be devoted to one specific religious tradition or theme, or offered as a comparative study of religious traditions.

The Zombie Zeitgeist and Monster Motif

(LA244)

3 Units

This course explores the zombie and monster as a literary, historical, and pop culture archetypes, focusing on their roles in horror, adventure, fantasy, and satiric literature and film. Spanning Antiquity to the present, this course surveys literature, cinema, and critical theory to examine the earliest precedents of such monsters in the Ancient and Classical world, the origins of zombies in West Africa and the Caribbean, their adoption in Western culture, and their subsequent proliferation in Latin America, Asia, and (back to) Africa. Zombies provide an ideal means through which to examine cultures and issues of xenophobia, globalization, capitalism, and individuality. It is a symbol that has crossed many borders, reaching truly global status in the last twenty years. Weekly assignments will require written reflection and analysis.

World Literature

(LA290)

3 Units

This course may focus on a specific author, period, theme, or culture.

CHOOSE ONE TO MEET THE AMERICAN CULTURAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT

 

PROJECT GREEN: SURF CULTURE

(LA213)

3 Units

A survey class examining the historical, cultural, socio-economic and environmental importance of surfing and its related activities. Through lectures and an examination of films, print advertisements, novel excerpts, newspaper and magazine articles, environmental publications, scholarly essays and excerpts from novels, students will think, read and write about surf culture. Topics will include: “The History of Surfing”; “Art History of Surfing”; “Surfing and Music: From Ukuleles to Fender Strats”; “Surfing and the Silver Screen”; “Surf Slang: Aloha Mr. Hand”; and “Surfers, Beatniks and Other Outlaws.” The modern surfing industry will also be examined through a cultural perspective that analyzes business practices, philosophy and branding via topics such as: “Board Design and Manufacturing”; “Extreme Action Sports: Surf, Snow, Skate, Moto, BMX”; “Surfing and Fashion: From Hula Skirts to Haute Couture”; and “Surfing and World Commerce.” Environmental aspects of Surf Culture will be examined via such topics as: “The Oceans: Perfect Storms and Rogue Waves”; “The Surfer as Activist: From Surfrider to Sea Shepherd”; “Pollution, Coastal Cliff Erosion and Man-Made Seawalls”; and “Surfing and Eco-Tourism.” Satisfies either the American Cultural Experience requirement or Liberal Arts elective.

American Cultures

(LA215)

3 Units

A sociological approach to the diversity of American cultures— highlighting the issues that the United States in particular faces as a pluralistic society undergoing profound changes.

COMIX AS AMERICAN LITERATURE

(LA216)

3 Units

Prerequisite: English Composition

A literary approach to American culture, this course considers the history of the comic medium, including the graphic novel and its place in American life not only as an aspect of popular culture, but as a legitimate and emerging art form. Recommended for Game Art, Animation and Illustration majors.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

(LA217)

3 Units

A political science approach to American culture, this course explores current political, social and economic issues in the U.S., seeks to discern their causes and examines possible solutions. Emphasis is on issues of a controversial nature. As with other courses in the Liberal Arts, this course can zoom in to examine a particular focus or theme each time it is run (e.g., NATION IN CRISIS).

AMERICAN LITERATURE

(LA218)

3 Units

A literary approach to American cultural, this is a survey course of the Literature of the Americas and may focus on a specific author (or group of authors), time period, theme or culture. By examining the literature that springs from the American psyche and helps to inform it, students better understand the culture that has shaped the Western World. As with other courses in the Liberal Arts, this course can zoom in to examine a particular focus or theme each time it is run (e.g., ICONOCLASTS OF AMERICAN LITERATURE and CALIFORNIA’S LITERARY LANDSCAPE).

GEOGRAPHY: ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPES AND THE HUMAN CONDITION

(LA220)

3 Units

A geographic approach to American culture, this course explores the interconnections between regions, resources and human development as it varies across America (and, by comparison, the globe). Physical environment as it relates to human welfare is considered, as well as concepts related to the construction (social and political) of regions, states and territories. Since an understanding of global interrelations is dependent upon local and regional landscapes/events, some of the semester is spent focusing on global relations. Satisfies either the American Cultural Experience requirement or the Non-Western Cultural Experience requirement.

GENDER STUDIES IN POPULAR CULTURE

(LA228)

3 Units

An interdisciplinary approach to American cultural, this course explores the origins and perceptions of gender in culture and society. Drawing on visual studies, literary theory, sociology, politics, economy, et al., issues of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, bias and stereotypes are explored as they relate primarily to media representation and language, as well as to such diverse topics as health, public policy, labor and law. Content in advertising (semiotics, visual literacy, etc.) is a good starting place to extend the analyses into television, film, music and game art. Satisfies either the American Cultural Experience requirement or the Non-Western Cultural Experience requirement.

AMERICAN CINEMA

(LA233)

3 Units

Prerequisite: Critical Reasoning

This is a survey course of films produced in the Americas and may focus on a specific filmmaker (or group of filmmakers), time period, theme, genre, or culture each time it is taught. Recently, for instance, the course focused on “Comedy and Horror,” each of which is adept at capturing the evolution of the American zeitgeist. Consider Billy Wilder’s commentary on gender during the 1950s in Some Like It Hot, Alfred Hitchcock’s timeless deliberation on fear as it relates to authority in Psycho, Mel Brooks’ condemnation of prejudice in 1974’s Blazing Saddles, or George Romero’s exploration of 1960s disillusionment in The Night of the Living Dead—each exposed students to the American experience by taking a close look at the fears, insecurities, obsessions and prejudices that are distinctly American.

SEE ALSO:

(LA227 / AH333)

- Units

RADICAL ISLAM + THE WEST (LA227) and SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM HISTORY (AH333)

NATURAL SCIENCES - The Artist & The Natural World

(-)

3 Units

(3 units required)

PROJECT GREEN: HILLSIDE

(LA101)

3 Units

An ecological survey of the native flora and fauna of our surrounding wilderness area. Students gain access to the private and protected canyon and hillsides behind our campus and collaborate as a research team to participate in the ecological restoration of a coastal sage scrub community, develop research questions, document results and propose further research. The canyon offers a unique outdoor class environment, applied research opportunity and a rewarding experience of engaged stewardship in our ecological community. Satisfies Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective.

PROJECT GREEN: RIDGE TO-REEF

(LA234)

3 Units

This course takes a systems approach that integrates PROJECT GREEN: HILLSIDE, by considering the greater regional watershed and its impact on the regeneration and sustainability of local natural resources, particularly water quality. The course will help foster a greater understanding of the regional watershed as a valuable asset to the ecological health of hillside and the coastal ocean environments. Students will have the opportunity to contribute their original research to “Voices of the Earth,” an archive of Earth observations and educational materials. Collaborations with outside organizations will provide opportunities for students to apply what they learn in the classroom to meaningful, conservation projects that are valued by the community. Satisfies Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective.

PROJECT GREEN: OCEANS

(LA242)

3 Units

This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to the coastal oceans of Orange County and likewise takes a systems approach that integrates Project GREEN: Hillside and PROJECT GREEN: RIDGE TO-REEF. As a part of the course work, students will observe, analyze physical processes and distribution of organisms in the intertidal and shallow zones and document their findings. These findings will be translated into digital educational materials that will be made available to the public. Students will also investigate coastal processes, coastal marine ecosystems (kelp forests, the intertidal zone) and the impact of humans on the coastal ocean. Students will study the marine mammals that call the Orange County coast home, for migratory seasons, or for all of the year. Students may help to create creating a social media site, “Voices of the Ocean,” that will serve as a forum for the public to engage as citizen scientists and provide information about the natural environment to the public in a variety of digital forms. We wish for students to become ocean literate citizens and to inform, inspire and engage others as they translate their newfound ocean literacy into meaningful action. Satisfies Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective.

PROJECT GREEN: SOCIAL ECOLOGY AND STEWARDSHIP

(LA126)

3 Units

This class explores social and ecological opportunities in the surrounding natural and cultural community.

PROJECT GREEN: ENVIRONMENTAL ECOLOGY

(LA222)

3 Units

This course explores the human relationship with our environment in a historical and contemporary context. Students examine the collapse of ancient civilizations as well as the ecological challenges faced in today’s modern world. Students investigate local and global environmental issues and discover the symbiotic relationship we share with our ecology.

FOOD, NUTRITION AND HEALTH

(LA212)

3 Units

Scientific concepts of nutrition relating to the functioning of nutrients in the basiclife processes. Emphasis will be on individual needs, food sources of nutrients, current nutrition issues and diet analysis. The course will address eating disorders, changing nutritional needs during the lifecycle, the relationship between nutrition and certain chronic diseases.

SCIENTIFIC ANATOMY

(LA125)

3 Units

Introduction to the human body structure and its functions. Skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous and reproductive systems are studied. Projects are intended to prepare students for their studio experiences in life drawing and life painting. Required for Illustration majors. No other course may be substituted.

HUMAN EVOLUTION

(LA250)

3 Units

This course provides an overview of the theories of human origins. Areas emphasized include human genetics, selective pressures, Darwinian gradualism, continental drift, migration patterns, mammals, comparative anatomy and the fossil record. A quantitative approach is employed. This course satisfies the mathematics requirement.

FOOD, NUTRITION AND HEALTH

(LA212)

3 Units

Scientific concepts of nutrition relating to the functioning of nutrients in the basiclife processes. Emphasis will be on individual needs, food sources of nutrients, current nutrition issues and diet analysis. The course will address eating disorders, changing nutritional needs during the lifecycle, the relationship between nutrition and certain chronic diseases.

SCIENTIFIC ANATOMY

(LA125)

3 Units

Introduction to the human body structure and its functions. Skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous and reproductive systems are studied. Projects are intended to prepare students for their studio experiences in life drawing and life painting. Required for Illustration majors. No other course may be substituted.

HUMAN EVOLUTION

(LA250)

3 Units

This course provides an overview of the theories of human origins. Areas emphasized include human genetics, selective pressures, Darwinian gradualism, continental drift, migration patterns, mammals, comparative anatomy and the fossil record. A quantitative approach is employed. This course satisfies the mathematics requirement.

HUMAN DIVERSITY

(LA255)

3 Units

Human Diversity explores biological variation in modern humans, biological concepts of species and subspecies and the race concept from a social perspective. Following completion of this course you should have a greater understanding of the misuse of the term “race,” an appreciation of human biological diversity and a grasp of the adaptive nature of human variation. This course satisfies the mathematics requirement.

HUMAN SEXUALITY

(LA260)

3 Units

Human Sexuality is a course that combines lectures, films, discussions and research to examine sexuality from physiological, psychological and sociological perspectives. Topics include history, anatomy, reproduction, cross-cultural perspectives, gender roles, myths, safety and variations in sexual expression.

COGNITIVE SCIENCES - The Human Mind & Its Processes

(-)

3 Units

(3 units required)

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

(LA235)

3 Units

This class will explore basic theories regarding the operations of the human mind and the mysteries of human behavior, both within individuals and across groups. From infancy to old age, what drives human emotions and alters perceptions and personalities, both consciously and unconsciously? What makes humans behave the way they do? Students will study a wide range of research and theoretical perspectives, from physiological to psychoanalytic, evolutionary to neurobiological. Students consider influences on mental cognition and mental health, studying the latest developments in psychological counseling, healing practices and art therapy. Satisfies either the Cognitive Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective.

3 Units

INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS

Language makes us human. Linguistics is the science of language. This course examines the science of how language changes and how it is learned, focusing on speech sounds, sound patterns, how words are formed and organized into sentences, and eventually understood. Students discover the common properties of languages—and the specific ways in which they differ—via the study of phonology (how our brain categorizes the sounds), phonetics (what sounds make up human language), morphology (how words are formed from smaller units of meaning), syntax (how words come together to form sentences), semantics (how we extract meaning from sentences), and pragmatics (how we acquire meaning from context and sentences). By surveying the features of many non-Western languages and various subfields in linguistics such as historical-, social-, and neuro- linguistics, as well as psychology and sign language studies (e.g., how language interacts with culture and social structure), this course may also be used to fulfill the Non-Western Culture requirement.

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

(-)

3 Units

(3 units required)

MATHEMATICS

(LA231)

3 Units

Students review basic concepts and processes in arithmetic and study key concepts and questions in geometry. The course explores questions in the philosophy of mathematics regarding the nature of numbers, space, infinity and truth, as well as topics of concern to artists such as proportion, the Golden Mean and the mathematics of light.

3 Units

Math, Science and Art: Golden Ratio to Neuroaesthetics

This course explores the intersections between Math, Science and Art in the fields of music, architecture, design, artmaking, optics, psychology, neuroscience, and physics. Each lecture and discussion will delve into the fascinating interplay between diverse disciplines, including the principles of the mathematics involved, yielding a richer and deeper understanding of the world.

SEE ALSO:

(LA250 / LA255)

- Units

HUMAN EVOLUTION (LA250) and HUMAN DIVERSITY (LA255)

LIBERAL ARTS
ELECTIVES

3 units required (from the following, via three 1-unit Art Spotlight classes, or any one 3-unit class not previously taken in Liberal Arts or Art History)

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION

(LA196)

Practice in the basics of fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of fiction's various theories and techniques. Students are introduced to a variety of literary styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other’s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Students broaden their understanding of the genre from a writer’s perspective, improve their mechanics in regard to craft, and come several steps closer to discovering their own unique voice and vision as a writer of fiction. Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: POETRY

(LA115)

3 Units

Practice in the basics of poetry writing, with a simultaneous exploration of poetry’s various theories and techniques. Students broaden their understanding of the genre from a writer’s perspective, improve their mechanics in regard to craft and come several steps closer to discovering their own unique voice and vision as a poet. The class edits and publishes a chapbook of their writing. The course culminates with a poetry reading on campus at the end of the semester to coincide with the release of the publication.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: NON-FICTION

(LA197)

3 Units

Practice in the basics of non-fiction writing, with a simultaneous exploration of non-fiction's various theories and techniques. Students become familiar with techniques and challenges related to a variety of non-fiction writing—biography, personal essay, memoir, historical profiles, newspaper reporting, magazine features, critical reviews. Students are introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other’s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Students broaden their understanding of the genre from a writer’s perspective, improve their mechanics in regard to craft, and come several steps closer to discovering their own unique voice and vision as a writer of non-fiction. Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: SCRIPT WRITING

(LA198)

3 Units

Practice in the basics of script writing, with a simultaneous exploration of various theories and techniques related to creating scripted stories. Students become familiar with common terminologies and structures—beat sheets, treatments, outlines, pitches, One Act, 3-act, 4-act, teleplays, screenplays, documentaries, multi-media, graphic novels, etc.—and are introduced to a variety of styles and devices via assigned readings by accomplished authors, with guided in-class discussions and group analyses of the craft at work in each piece (aspects such as structure, conflict, plot, character, point of view, setting, dialogue, voice, tone, narrative form). Students complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other’s new writing, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Students broaden their understanding of the genre from a writer’s perspective, improve their mechanics in regard to craft, and come several steps closer to discovering their own unique voice and vision as a writer of scripts. Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: MULTI-GENRE

(LA194)

3 Units

Practice in the basics of writing in multiple genres, offering students a wide range of options for expressing their stories and words regardless of the forms they may take. Traditional literary genres as well as vehicles such as songwriting and spoken word performance art will be considered, yet this class is meant to help encourage daring and difficult works that may push the boundaries of established forms and formalities. This may include multiple-disciplinary literature, literary artwork, installations, interactive works, intertextuality, and new media. Students explore different avenues for their writing, understanding that there is no single "right way" to communicate a story, and that sometimes new inventions of form and even format may be called for. Students complete a variety of writing assignments and similarly take part in close critiques of each other’s new work, both in class and via written feedback composed away from class, providing textual analysis from both aesthetic and technical standpoints, articulating both emotional and intellectual responses to the works. Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: STORYTELLING

(LA199)

3 Units

Both a survey course and a creative writing course, the focus is on the art and craft of how stories are told across artistic genres. Storytelling is employed in various ways within each of our studio majors: literary devices and narrative techniques can add richness and depth to artwork, regardless of genre.  By learning about comparative storytelling across cultures, and by practicing some of these techniques via original writing assignments, students gain a deeper understanding of how the human story can be effectively told.  Satisfies either the writing leg of the Creative Writing Minor or the American Cultural Experience (in some semesters, the Non-Western Cultural Experience Requirement). Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: LITERARY SUMMER INTENSIVE

(LA193)

3 Units

Under the guidance of LCAD Creative Writing faculty, students travel to various cities to experience first-hand both the historic and currently thriving literary centers. We visit author’s homes and stomping grounds, bookstores, museum/gallery/events, and perhaps meet and workshop with established authors and agents. Students are assigned directed readings focusing on writing either generated from or written about each area visited, and assignments are the student’s own creative writing—inspired by the writing, art, and culture of each place. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment priority will be given to Creative Writing Minors, but this class could be taken by any student to fulfill the Liberal Arts elective.

DIRECTED RESEARCH AND WRITING

(LA103, LA03, LA303, LA403)

1-3 Units

Specifically designed for those who have declared a minor in either Creative Writing or Art History. Intensive studies in specifically designed coursework, supervised one-on-one with a faculty mentor who directs the work as independent study. A student must be in good academic standing, have a mentor instructor who agrees to direct the study, and present to the mentor a proposed focus for the units earned; this then needs to be approved by both the instructor and chair. If approved, the instructor crafts specific assignments and learning outcomes for that semester’s study, allowing for very specific scholarship to be pursued. Three units of credit for Art History or Fiction would require roughly 5 books read and 5000-7000 words written over the course of the semester (less word count for poetry or songwriting, but equivalent workload). Attendance at events or visits to the theater may contribute to the research element. For Art History coursework, some of the writing could take the form of journals and more informal reflections, however a formal academic written analysis of some kind must be part of the writing produced. For Art History, museum visits or personal tours of artifacts, et. al, may contribute to the research. The instructor determines the balance, depending on the materials and areas of study; each case would be unique. A student can earn all units toward a minor via this "Directed Research and Writing" coursework : Course numbers LA103, 203, 303 & 403 for Liberal Arts and AH103, 203, 303, and 403 for Art History: 103 for the first 3 units, 203 for the next 3 units, etc. Other qualifying courses (including those in transfer) can also apply to the minor in any combination to reach the 12-unit total. Directed Research and Writing is not designed to teach an existing LA or AH course on an independent study basis. Rather, it is for students pursuing a minor in Art History or Creative Writing.

SPEECH/ACTING

(LA141)

2 Units

A practical course especially designed for the communicative needs of the professional artist. The physical dynamics of acting resources and exercises are incorporated for developing the powers of self-observation, self-confidence, flexibility, and stage presence.

ACTING FOR THE ANIMATORS

(LA143)

2 Units

The challenge for the animator is to create the illusion of life in animated images. Through the analysis of animated films and the study of theoretical considerations of performance, students learn acting techniques that can help create lifelike characters. This course is reserved for Animation majors. It satisfies the Speech Requirement for Animators and is to be taken during the junior year.

ART SPOTLIGHT

(LA195)

1 Units

Art Spotlight is a one-unit course designed to closely examine a specific artist, movement, or issue within the arts, or compare two or more artist, movements, or issues. As the course is only one unit, by design the focus will be narrow and the studies intense—like a spotlight. A semester’s focus might be on any one of the following: “Minimalist Art and Music”; “Bob Dylan”; “Cassatt’s Women”; “Tex Avery and Chuck Jones”; “Graffiti, Wheastpaste and Street Art”; “Picasso and Braque”; “Whitman’s Leaves of Grass”; “The Gaming Culture”; “Ownership Issues in Art”; “Warhol and Banksy”; “Spielberg”; “Modern Architecture”; “In the Steps of Martha Graham”; “de Beauvoir and Sartre”; “The Genius of Tom Stoppard”; “Caravaggio”, etc.

HEALING PRACTICES WORKSHOP

(LA214)

1 Units

A participatory workshop course designed to introduce students to a number of healing practices, both western and non-western. Students learn about and practice various methods of healing for both mind and body: yoga, meditation, therapeutic massage, controlled breathing for stress relief, etc. A guest masseuse demonstrates head, neck, arm and hand massage specifically for artists, proper sitting and standing poses for long work sessions, etc.

MYTHOLOGY

(LA265)

1 Units

Prerequisites: Critical Reasoning

An exploration of myth as a catalyst for art, including drama, dance, opera, et al.

ART HISTORY: THE ARTISTIC CONTINUUM

(-)

15 Units

REQUIRED

6 Units

AESTHETICS--Art and Beauty

Required

AESTHETICS

(AH420)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Junior standing and Critical Reasoning. Required of all students, this course is taken after completing all art history requirements.

Students consider such questions as: What is Art? What is Beauty? What is the role and responsibility of artists in society? Are there genuine standards by which we can judge art? Students participate in dialogues concerning these and other crucial questions.

WESTERN
ART HISTORY (9 units required)

WESTERN ART 1 & 2

(AH210 / AH220)

3 / 3 Units

Prerequisites: English Composition; Western Art 1 may be taken concurrently with Critical Reasoning, but not before. Western Art 1 must be taken before Western Art 2

WESTERN ART 1 (AH210) 3 units
WESTERN ART 2 (AH220) 3 units
These two course combine to forma yearlong course introducing students to art historical issues and important monuments from pre-history through the mid-nineteenth century in the Western tradition. It establishes a social, political and historical context for the production of art in society and provides art students with a sense of the historical development of styles as a continuous tradition relating to their own work. This course is coordinated with the Western Civilization courses.

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART

(AH320)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Western Art 1 and 2

This required course addresses developments in art from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Although the course focuses on the Western art scene, issues of contemporary global art are also discussed. Museum and gallery visits are required.

NON-WESTERN
ART HISTORY  (3 units required)

ASIAN ART HISTORY

(AH335)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Modern and Contemporary Art History

An introductory examination of the arts of China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and the Himalayas. This course uses the Asian collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Norton Simon Museum and other public and private exhibition spaces for a close examination of the form and content of Asian artworks. The course will include lectures, guided readings, documentary resources and required fieldwork. This course satisfies either the Non-Western Art History requirement or the Non-Western Cultural Experience requirement.

RODIN: THE MAN, THE TIME, THE ART

(AH301)

This course focuses on the personal and cultural circumstances out of which Rodin's powerful aesthetic language emerged. Students study the sculpture’s life works, as well as a lost wax method employed by Rodin, one of the most celebrated sculptors in western history.

SEE ALSO:

(-)

ART AND CULTURE OF AFRICA (LA252) and SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM HISTORY (AH333)

3 Units

SPECIALIZED HISTORIES OF THE MAJORS

(Required)

HISTORY OF ILLUSTRATION

(AH331)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Western Art I and II; may be taken concurrently with Modern + Contemporary Art, but not before

An examination of the major artists and trends in the history of illustration. The course emphasizes the development and role of illustration as an art form. Major fields covered include posters, comics, animation, computer graphics, editorial and advertising illustration and book and magazine illustration. Required for Illustration majors.

HISTORY OF ANIMATION

(AH332)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Western Art I and II; may be taken concurrently with Modern and Contemporary Art, but not before

The course examines the development of animation from its inception through present-day manifestations in television, films and the Internet. Major animators and key works are analyzed and discussed. Required for Animation majors.

HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN

(AH334)

3 Units

Required for Graphic Design majors

(AH334) 3 units
Against the background of visual and public communication from the Stone Age to the 21st century, this course examines the emergence of graphic design and the professional designer from 1800 C.E. to the present. By exploring the relationship between individual designers and their processes and inventions within specific historical movements, students learn of key historical figures and design movements within their cultural contexts. Continual conceptual and technological revolution is the essence of this subject and theme of this course.

HISTORY OF REPRESENTATIONAL PAINTING

(AH337)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Modern and Contemporary Art

This course seeks to trace the sources of the Western representational tradition from the nineteenth century to the present day. A key concern of the class will be to define the very nature of realism as an artistic perception. The demise of the so-called avant-garde has opened up an enormous diversity of artistic approaches, many of which are figurative. The course will examine some of these recent developments. This course is required for Drawing + Painting majors.

HISTORY OF GAME ART

(AH338)

3 Units

This course chronicles the history and evolution of game design while reflecting on its immediacy through the Internet and game culture trends. Students examine the social and artistic influences in computer-mediated communications and consider game theory principles while examining the motive, strategy, competition and psychology of the game.

ART HISTORY
ELECTIVES

ART HISTORY IN EUROPE

(AH200)

3 Units

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

A course taken as part of our Summer Program in Europe. This program, under the guidance of LCAD art history faculty, has led students to France, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Greece to study and experience world-class monuments and museums.

ART NOW: MUSEUMS, ART CENTERS

(AH211)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Modern and Contemporary Art

A fieldwork course analyzing the current offerings of Southern California’s exhibition spaces. Students examine art shows holistically, considering the site, exhibition design, scholarship and commercial promotion that attend and frame an artwork on public display.

VAN GOGH’S UNTOLD JOURNEY

(AH300)

- Units

This course considers the role of family, faith and artistic inspiration in the art of Vincent Van Gogh. Students examine the impact of literature on Van Gogh’s visual art production throughout his career: he was a life-long reader of Charles Dickens and Victor Hugo and was profoundly influenced by the Bible. Many of the central themes of his art were rooted in literary depictions and descriptions. Students analyze Van Gogh's formal and stylistic development as a response to his daily life struggles and how he used his art to navigate through life in very practical ways. The class explores Van Gogh’s deep ruminations on art and art theory and his practical wisdom as expressed in his extant 900 letters.

DELACROIX: A VOLCANO CONCEALED BENEATH BOUQUETS

(AH302)

- Units

In this seminar-style course, students read and respond to the journal of Delacroix with written responses that are shared with the entire class on a weekly basis. An intimate portrait of this master emerges via films and slide lectures that augment the readings and provide a historical and personal context for student reflections. There arespecific lectures on color theory and Delacroix’s palette and the graphic focus of Delacroix’s expressive art. Additionally, some of his musical influences (such as Mozart, Chopin, etc.) are played and discussed in the context of Delacroix’s aesthetic views.

BOHEMIAN AMERICA

(AH321)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Modern and Contemporary Art

A multidisciplinary consideration of the emergence of the American avant-garde as a counterculture between 1948 and 1968. This course examines the complex relationships between painters, poets, musicians, sculptors and novelists in post-WWII America. The works of Jack Kerouac, Joan Brown, Charlie Parker, Allen Ginsberg, Lee Krasner, Chuck Berry, Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Bob Dylan, Sylvia Plath, The Velvet Underground and many others are examined.

SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM HISTORY

(AH333)

3 Units

Satisfies the Non-Western Art History requirement or Western Cultural Experience requirement or Non-Western Art Cultural Experience requirement, depending on the special topic offered.

BAROQUE ART

(AH365)

3 Units

Prerequisites: Western Art 2

This course covers the art and architecture of Europe between 1600 and 1750, emphasizing the relationship between the production of art and the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, the rise of absolute monarchies and the emergence of the Middle Class. Major artists studied include Rembrandt, Velasquez, Caravaggio, Bernini and Rubens.